Paintings

Description of John Constable's painting “Salisbury Cathedral”


John Constable is one of the most talented English landscape painters who incomparably conveys the beauty of English landscapes, fresh air and the boundless energy of nature. The constable did not paint his paintings according to academic rules, he tried to create a landscape as close to reality as possible.

The specific manner of writing by an English artist can be seen in his wonderful painting, The Salisbury Cathedral, painted in 1825. The innocence of nature, the majesty of the cathedral and the realism of the image, together create a unique landscape. The cathedral itself is depicted in the gap between the trees, the building against the sky attracts even more enthusiastic looks.

John Constable 20-30 XIX often visited Salisbury Cathedral and had long planned to write it, making sketches and choosing a suitable angle. But once in 1822 he received an order from Bishop Fisher to depict the cathedral on the canvas, for which the artist willingly took up. But the task was not easy, since the first picture of the bishop was not very satisfied, the reason for this was the dark sky above the cathedral, then Constable wrote a new picture that satisfied the taste of the bishop.

The picture has a rather interesting feature, in the lower left corner two people are depicted, this is Bishop Fisher and his wife watching the beauty of Salisbury Cathedral. Looking at the picture, the viewer immediately wants to find himself on this English lawn and feel the heady smells and fabulous sounds of nature.

Another important line of the picture is the comparison of the creations of nature and the creations of man, the cathedral and trees are compared, the artist always believed that a dried-up old tree is more beautiful than any new structure.

The constable has always remained an “artistic patriot,” because he always portrayed “his old England” in his works.





Nikolay Ge

Watch the video: Constable - English Romantic Painter John Constable 1776 to 1837 (September 2020).