Paintings

Description of the painting by Kazimir Malevich “Flower Girl”


In many ways, this picture is a unique work of art - primarily because it gives us, mostly familiar with the artist’s suprematist experience (such as “Square” and “Athletes”), an idea of ​​another Malevich.

At the end of the 20s, the artist, engaged in the reconstruction of his creative path, unexpectedly turns to the techniques that already managed to become history - impressionism, Fauvism and neo-primitivism.

At the same time, Malevich purposefully dated the paintings of those years to the beginning of the twentieth century. Until some time, "Flower Girl" was considered almost the earliest painting of the artist, however, one gaze cast at this picture will dispel any doubts about the true time of its creation.

First, the “Flower Girl”, in which the influence of Malevich’s non-primitivistic experiments is clearly felt, does not fit into what we are used to call “Russian impressionism of the beginning of the centuries”. Secondly, the contrast between the figure of the flower girl herself, associated with the era of the 1920s, and the passers-by surrounding her, who looked more appropriate on the canvas of the 80s, is striking.

These features, however, do not negate the artistic merit of the painting. The look of the flower girl, her hat, basket in her hands is very realistic. At the same time, a few surreal features slip in it, which are concentrated in the tense figure of heroin, which is emphasized by a bold color combination - blue and bright orange. It is also worth noting the diverse, complex composition of the picture.

So, behind the flower girl there are high-rise buildings, almost merging with the sky, and pretty well-drawn supporting characters, and the street. All this makes the researchers of Malevich’s work again and again refer to this canvas as a curious example of the artist’s late work.





Whitening Canvas Serebryakova

Watch the video: SUPREMATISM Explained (September 2020).