Paintings

Description of the painting by Anthony Van Dyck "Cupid and Psyche"


A well-known mythological story about the union of Cupid (or the god of love Cupid) and the mortal girl Psyche, who was later granted the immortality of the gods. Based on the giving, the girl’s parents asked Amur to marry her, however, he was fascinated by her beautiful beauty and decided to marry her himself.

Having taken her to a fabulous beautiful castle, he visited her only at night, in complete darkness, so as not to show his face and true origin. However, envious sisters all the time urged her to look at her husband by any means and make sure that he was a blond, handsome young man, and that a terrible monster was dressed up in the form of a terrible snake.

The girl gave in to the persuasion and, with a ruse, saw the face of her beloved husband, but Amur was saddened by what had happened and left his wife to grieve alone in the castle. Psyche for a very long time was looking for a way to apologize to her husband, until she met the goddess Venus. Venus did not want to continue this union between god and woman and therefore decided to kill Psyche by deceit.

In his composition, Van Dyck decided to depict the moment where Psyche, after a long separation, meets his beloved Cupid. Cupid is depicted as a naked blond youth, with the beautiful body of the god Olympus. Snow-white angel wings grow from his back.

Cupid flies up to his beloved, touching her beautiful face with his own hands. Psyche is depicted in a long dream, and next to the open gift of Venus. Their red and blue robes are symbolically used by the author to distinguish between masculine and feminine. They are the most striking elements of the picture, while the background is very uniform.

Dark trees, not particularly detailed, made in golden brown tons harmonize well with the colors of the earth of stones and clouds, without paying too much attention.





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