Paintings

Description of Vasily Shebuev's painting Self-Portrait


Shebuyev is a Russian painter who preferred academism and classicism from all styles, paid tribute to the writing style of the classics and did not even experiment with cubism or impressionism.

The themes that he chose for his paintings are quite typical for this approach - namely, historical and genre scenes, periodically from deviations into religious or mythological subjects. His paintings are characterized by detail, monumentality and scope inherent in classicism.

A lot of characters, several submissions, separate scenes, united by a common plot in one epic canvas - all this is normal for him. However, when it comes to his own self-portrait, Shebuyev comes up to business with surprising negligence. In fact, his self-portrait is a pencil sketch, made very talented and neat, worked out, but still devoid of background and color.

The artist is depicted on it in his youth - curly, with a long narrow face, with a slight half-smile on his lips and a kind look, he looks like a student who is going to college for a couple and who sincerely loves his job.

The impression is enhanced by a folder with ties - most likely, there are drawings in it, and this touch complements the portrait, makes it more voluminous. Shebuev has a fountain pen in his right hand, he holds a folder with his left and looks frivolous, cheerful, contented with life. The self-portrait is comprehensively far from classicism, and from academicism, which are inherent in some parade and solemnity in the image of a person.

On his self-portrait, Shebuev rather conveys his own character, catches a meaningful expression on his face, rather than striving to seem serious and strict. There is something in this from self-irony, from the ability to present itself to the public, not only in full dress, but also as you really are.

And this is good, because it turns out a portrait of the artist, and not an empty calm mask from his face.





Giuseppe Arcimboldo Pictures

Watch the video: Behind the scenes at the Framing Department. The National Gallery, London (October 2020).