Paintings

Description of the painting by Michelangelo Buanarroti “Conversion of Saul”


The penultimate work of the legendary artist and architect Michelangelo was "The Conversion of Saul." The painting was made as a fresco for one of the monasteries. It consists of two parts.

The first part shows Jesus Christ directing righteous fire at the unit of Saul. He is surrounded by half-naked angels who either consider his action or are removed on errands. Some of them have scarlet cloaks on their bodies, others have green and turquoise dresses.

The second part of the picture displays a small detachment, in the middle of which lies Saul himself. The blow of Jesus knocks him out of the saddle, and he falls to the ground. His warriors scatter wherever. Some are trying to help him.

Saul is a famous persecutor of Christians. His goal was to collect a powerful detachment that would expel all Christians from their land. Saul was merciless, and destroyed entire settlements of righteous people. But once, in one of his campaigns, he received a crushing blow to the head. There was no one nearby. But afterwards, he understood what was happening, as the voice of Jesus came from above.

In the picture, we see the surprised Saul, looking up. Jesus is looking at him from heaven, with angels on his sides. The face of Jesus expresses anger, and the movements are aimed at the complete destruction of the detachment. But still, he gives Saul a chance.

Saul’s detachment wanders wherever. According to the surprised faces portrayed by Michelangelo, it seems that they do not understand what is happening. One of Saul's loyal warriors grabbed a shield and directed it up to cover his commander. Some part of the squad flees. Without turning around, they run away from what is happening.

On the right you can see how Saul’s horse runs away, which his soldiers are trying to stop. But nothing comes of it, and the horse only scatters people in different directions.





Picture Goldfinch

Watch the video: ARTH 2020 Catholic Baroque 3: Caravaggio, Calling of St. Matthew (September 2020).