Paintings

Description of the painting by Salvador Dali "The Sun"


Salvador Dali is the most famous surrealist artist, whom everyone remembers for his fusible, soft watches flowing from branches. His name is mentioned when they start to remember extravagant eccentrics or when a topic comes up about how modern art is incomprehensible to a person, and in his years he was a real cultural phenomenon, a universal favorite, a genius who wiped his feet over the worshiping audience over and over again.

Speaking about his paintings, he never called them art, putting himself on a par with the stars of mass culture rather than with artists of the old days.

On his talent, he made money, shocked a bored light, not recognizing any framework, used the expressiveness of his own brush to turn himself inside out, realizing the most fun trick possible - here is a man, here he shows a trembling, lively inside, but he still breathes, still moves .

His “Sun” - a picture for him is quite typical, from the first glance not unravelable. To look at it from the beginning is the same as looking at the daub of any half-educated artist, because at first glance it is only visible that it is huge, golden, full and resembling just a yellow disc.

However, if you step back a few steps, the details become clear - and the face looming in the sun, a crafty one, winking with one eye, and its light ribbing, and distant resemblance to a coin placed on the edge. The image of the sun is devoid of the usual halo of divinity and godliness. It is shown almost familiarly, as if the artist was closely acquainted with him.

And two vague, vague female figures go into it - chiseled, dressed with a hint of high fashion, cast elongated red shadows.

At the level of associations, their departure is similar to leaving in mundane life under the rule of a golden calf - it is not for nothing that the sun is so unambiguously associated with a coin.





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Watch the video: Meeting Salvador Dali in the Fourth Dimension - Thomas Banchoff (September 2020).