Paintings

Description of the painting by Aristarchus Lentulov "St. Basil"


Lentulov in his time was affectionately called the Russian futurist, and in many ways this was true. His works, going beyond the scope of paintings, characterized by strong dynamics and problems incomprehensible to the general public, bore all the imprints of futurism to be considered to belong to this movement.

However, if the futurists, as a rule, turned to the future - to industrial cities growing beyond their own borders, stretching upwards and riddled with an incredible combination of faces according to the laws of the future, then Lentunov, on the contrary, turned to the past. His paintings combined the seemingly incongruous - the hoary antiquity of Russian classical architecture, ancient buildings that survived centuries and the new-fangled trend of the artistic style, in which everything was mixed and turned upside down.

"St. Basil" depicts not just the eponymous cathedral, although its domes (even brighter than in life) are undoubtedly present in the picture, but as if all of Moscow with its Old Arbat, Red Square, Garden Ring. Several centuries of life of a huge city fit into the picture. The perspective is violated in it, the color solutions seem incredibly bright and therefore somewhat clumsy.

Most of all, it resembles the pattern that can be seen by looking into the kaleidoscope - here it is, bright, beautiful, festive - but if you just shake the handset slightly, it will crumble and form again. In the case of the painting, you expect that St. Isaac's Cathedral from St. Petersburg or the Savior on Blood from Yekaterinburg will suddenly appear on it. What another city will appear in it - it will appear and also stand out from the picture, seeming impossible, not in the way it could be seen from the point of view of the viewer, but as if enveloping itself and enclosing in itself.

Impossible dynamics leaves such an impression - a closed, frozen movement, which at any moment is ready to spin further.





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Watch the video: The Tragic Story Behind St. Basils Cathedral (September 2020).